Triumph TR6 (1969-1973): Phil Bell's Market Watch

Classic Cars magazine’s editor Phil Bell regularly shares some of his best market insights to help you with your next buy. This week he contemplates the rise, rise and fall of one of Britain’s finest sports cars, the Triumph TR6.

Ferrari 308 GTB (1975-1985) – Price tracker

Every Thursday, we’re tracking the values of the most popular classic cars on the UK market. Thanks to our friends at Classic Car Weekly, we can focus on one car and compare its values from 2005 to today – and then anticipate where they will be in 2025. This week, we analyse the Ferrari 308 GTB – the most iconic of all the 1970s junior supercars, and the one to have. Classic Car Weekly’s editor David Simister explains.

Wolseley 6/80 (1948-55) – Price tracker

Every Thursday, we’re tracking the values of the most popular classic cars on the UK market. Thanks to our friends at Classic Car Weekly, we can focus on one car and compare its values from 2005 to today – and then anticipate where they will be in 2025. This week, we analyse the Wolseley 6/80 – the car that will forever be associated with the long arm of the law. Classic Car Weekly’s editor David Simister explains.

Rover P4 75 (1950-1952) – price tracker

Every Thursday, we’re tracking the values of the most popular classic cars on the UK market. Thanks to our friends at Classic Car Weekly, we can focus on one car and compare its values from 2005 to today – and then anticipate where they will be in 2025. This week, we analyse the Rover P4 – the company’s solid luxury saloon that kept a generation of bank managers mobile during the 1950s and ‘60s. Classic Car Weekly’s editor David Simister explains.

Jaguar E-type 2+2s hotting up

Demand for good Jaguar E-type 2+2s has pushed prices up 45 per cent over the past two years, despite them being the least coveted variants. Until recently, high values and high-quality restorations have been largely reserved for the better-proportioned two-seater coupés and roadsters, but the child-friendly 2+2s are playing catch-up.

Buy an Aston V8 wisely

You can pay anywhere from £50k to £500k for an Aston Martin V8 now, so I can’t help but wish I’d taken out a meaty loan to buy the smart £40k V8 Vantage that I borrowed for the day a few years ago. Not because I have any interest in playing the classic car investment game but because, as it turns out, that was my last chance to own one.

Lamborghini Miuras buck the market

While prices for period rival Ferraris such as the Daytona have fallen back from their market peak, the Miura continues to grow, with the original P400 and its P400S successor up 13% and 11% respectively.

Testarossas cool off

The plight of the Ferrari Testarossa illustrates a common market phenomenon. Unfashionable classic finds favour when the schoolboys who lusted after them grow up into a serious buying force and prices surge. 

Price Guide Movers

The latest round of price increases reminds us that the market isn’t just hungry for younger classics. The top ten climbers is headed by the Porsche 924 Turbo, up 88% to £2k-£15k, depending on condition, and also includes the Renault 17TS/Gordini, Volvo 262C coupé, Ford Escort MkII Ghia and Audi Quattro 20V ranging from 33% to 58% up.

But the headliners also include the Forties Jaguar 3.5-litre, Fifties Sunbeam Alpine and Fifties Daimler Century drophead, all up by more than 50%.

The latest round of fallers, however, is dominated by pre-Seventies cars – but even the biggest slide, for the Mercedes 500K Cabriolet, is only 12%.

The full table of the latest climbers and fallers is revealed in the June issue of Classic Cars magazine.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 18 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.

Phil Bell

Editor, Classic Cars magazine

For more details of the latest issue, visit www.classiccarsmagazine.co.uk

A Porsche 911 Turbo, please

With exceptional late air-cooled Porsche 911s making headline figures at auctions – by those I mean low-mileage, fully historied examples of the most extreme performance models – the first watercooled Turbos look good value.

The 2003 example that we test in the latest issue of Classic Cars is up for £60k, which is at the upper end of the price spectrum for these. But when you discover that it’s only done just over 28,000 miles from new and is fresh from restoration by Porsche Centre West London as part of the annual Porsche dealership restoration competition, it seems good value. Oh, and I didn’t mention that it gives you 400bhp to play with.

If you’re happy to buy one with 50-70k on the odometer, prices are more like £40k-50k. That’s tremendous performance for the money, with the added reassurance that the Turbo used a variant of the tough Mezger-designed flat six, which is free from the notorious intermediate shaft bearing and cylinder wall failures that can afflict the mainstream watercooled flat sixes.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 18 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.

Phil Bell

Editor, Classic Cars magazine

For more details of the latest issue, visit www.classiccarsmagazine.co.uk