Ford Pilot To Buy

The Ford Pilot’s handsome and confident American styling and flathead V8 propulsion look extremely attractive at anything from the £6k entry price for something usable through to circa £20k for a faultless example.

But various design flaws and limited parts and specialist network can catch out the unwary. Fortunately, the latest issue of Classic Cars magazine includes an in-depth buying guide to guide you through the challenges, and make buying and owning one as simple and pleasurable as possible.

Imagine the sense of occasion when showing up at anything from a favourite pub to a classic car event in something so distinctive.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 18 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.

Phil Bell

Editor, Classic Cars magazine

For more details of the latest issue, visit www.classiccarsmagazine.co.uk

 

 

Esprit Turbo Last Chance

After being left for dust in the price acceleration race by rival Ferraris and Porsches, the Lotus Esprit Turbo seems to be on the move, with top auction and dealer examples already tipping over the £20k mark.

That still doesn’t make the Esprit Turbo expensive for such a fast, sharp-handling and dramatic looking car, especially as privately advertised examples can be found for 10 per cent less. In the current market you can have a lot less fun for a lot more money.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 18 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.

Phil Bell

Editor, Classic Cars magazine

For more details of the latest issue, visit www.classiccarsmagazine.co.uk

It’s Midget and Sprite time!

With the prices of top-condition MG Midgets and equivalent Austin-Healey Sprites lagging behind the market – and particularly their old rival, the Triumph Spitfire – now looks like a good time to buy.

I’ve always found the Midget and Sprite more fun to drive, and also surprisingly accommodating for my 6ft 1in frame. Excellent examples can be bought from £6-£7k, with £11k buying the best. And after that initial investment your ownership costs will be tiny, leaving you with nothing more to worry about than which twiddly B-road you’re going to attack next.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 18 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.

 

Phil Bell

Editor, Classic Cars magazine

 

For more details of the latest issue, visit www.classiccarsmagazine.co.uk

Style and ingenuity from £2k - Lancia Style!

With prices starting at £2k for a usable saloon or £4k for the equivalent coupé, the Lancia Flavia is looking very tempting right now.

These cars bristle with clever design including aluminium flat-four engines, front-wheel drive and disc brakes, and in coupé and cabriolet forms offer the sort of Pininfarina styling normally reserved for Ferraris.

The best saloons are £10-£15k, coupés £25-£35k and cabrios £30-£40k, which still looks attractive when you consider the alternatives. As the buying guide in the latest issue of Classic Cars magazine reveals, repair costs aren’t disproportionate unless you pay too much for an example with too many faults. Our detailed advice should help you spot the trouble areas so that you can negotiate on the price, or vote with your feet.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 16 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.

 

Phil Bell

Editor, Classic Cars magazine

 

For more details of the latest issue, visit classiccarsmagazine.co.uk

Jaguar XJ12 Takes Top Spot

Of the 289 movers in the latest update of the Classic Cars magazine Price Guide, just 32 are fallers. The rest are showing growth of anything up to 71%. That chart-topping figure is achieved by the Jaguar XJ12 Coupé, meaning that decent examples now start at £9k and you can pay anywhere from £16-24k depending on how perfect the car is. The six-cylinder version isn’t far behind with figures around 20% lower than the V12 model.

The top five slots are locked out by cars that hitherto have been keeping quiet – Lotus Esprit S2, Triumph Spitfire MkII and original Spitfire 4.

Fallers show no pattern of age or car type, with the Subaru Impreza Turbo and Austin Atlantic coupé topping the chart at -14% and -12% respectively. Now, that pairing would make for a diverse two-car garage.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 16 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.

Phil Bell

Editor, Classic Cars magazine

For more details of the latest issue, visit www.classiccarsmagazine.co.uk

Range Rovers Rocket!

You’d think my friend who sold his early Range Rover last year for a few hundred pounds would suffer a head-in-the-hands moment at the news that an early example has just sold for £93k. But the big number was for the first production car, built of course in 1970 and with an A-suffix to the chassis number. It was also restored to original condition.

My friend’s car was at the other end of the spectrum with a shortened chassis, hybrid Series 3/Defender bodywork and countless DIY shed-quality modifications that together transformed it into an off-road special. It was one of very many similar conversions that contributed to the rarity of the untouched originals that are so prized today. Without such attrition, I doubt that two door Range Rovers would be attracting anything like the attention and values that they are now.

It also underlines how, as a car matures from loved old classic to collectible piece of significant motoring history, buyers will put ever higher premiums on original specification, fittings and finishes. Conversely, the more that you personalise a car, the more you narrow its market until it only appeals to one person – you.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 16 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.

 

Phil Bell

Editor, Classic Cars magazine

 

For more details of the latest issue, visit www.classiccarsmagazine.co.uk

 

Honda CR-X

Honda’s sharp-looking and sharp-handling CR-X coupé is a reminder that there was more to fun Eighties motoring than the much-celebrated hot hatch. And with buyers clamouring for all of the predictable Peugeots, VWs, Renaults and Fords, the now scarce Honda makes a very appealing alternative, with good examples starting at around £4k and the very best topping £12k.

Spec ranges from the early 60bhp, twin-carburettor-fed 1.5-litre model through to the sizzling 1.6i V-T (SiR in Japan) with its 150bhp VTEC (variable valve timing) engine, all driving the front wheels.

The challenge is finding the right car and keeping it in top condition thanks to scarcity of survivors and patchy parts supply, so the in-depth buying guide in the latest issue of Classic Cars magazine is a must-read for advice on where to source cars and how to check them for the sort of problems that might taint your ownership.

So a CR-X might not be as easy to own as a Ford or VW, but life would be dull without challenges, right?

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 16 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.

 

Phil Bell

Editor, Classic Cars magazine

 

For more details of the latest issue, visit www.classiccarsmagazine.co.uk

Price Guide Winners and Losers

To illustrate how nuanced the classic car market is right now, the monthly round-up of the top 72 price guide winners and losers in Classic Cars magazine includes everything from the Blower Bentley to the BMW M535i; and late-model Porsches appear at the top of the charts of both winners and losers, depending on model.

Sharing the winner’s top slot are the Bentley Speed Six, Blower Bentley and BMW M535i (E12 generation) with a weighty 99% growth. They’re followed by Porsche 911 Carrera (964 generation) at 70% and its Turbo brother rounding out the top five at 50%.

The losers show much less spectacular figures with even the biggest only managing a 13% fall, meaning that you can now buy a mint Porsche Boxster 2.5 for just £5k. The newer and much more powerful 3.2S has dropped 10%, making mint examples a £9k bargain. If you’ve never tried one of these tactile and practical little gems, now’s the time. While their 911 big brother boasts all of the big numbers, the Boxster is much more fun at sane and legal speeds.

The Lamborghini 400GT (pictured), Porsche 911 Turbo 4 and Carrera (both 993 generation) wound out the top five fallers, losing 6.3, 6.0 and 5.3% respectively. Hardly drastic losses considering how 2016 buyers have shunned the meteoric rises in the classic Porsche market of previous years.

They may have a way to fall yet, but special examples of these later Porsches will surely return to growth long term as a younger generation of enthusiasts seeks excitement in post-chrome-era classics.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 16 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.
 

Phil Bell,
Editor, Classic Cars magazine

For more details of the latest issue, visit www.classiccarsmagazine.co.uk

 

Peugeot 205 GTI

It doesn’t seem long ago that we were tipping these sharp-looking road terriers as undervalued smart buys. It couldn’t last. First it was the perfect, ultra-low mileage examples that made the headlines – one sold recently for £30k – while inevitably cars with high mileage or needing work were left alone. But we’ve just seen a well-used 1.6 example make £2.4k.

So it seems the market is becoming hungry for them in any condition, in the way that sporting Ford Escort MkIs were chased upwards a decade ago. As history repeats itself, the generation that grew up aspiring to these, or owning them as disposable transport when they were secondhand bargains has the money to buy the best, or restore one to top condition. Faced with the realisation that supplied of perfect, unmodified examples are scarce, they’re prepared to spend ever more on chasing the dream.

But aside from headline-grabbing auction examples, good cars with normal mileages can be bought for a third of the price of a Ford Escort Mexico. For now.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 16 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.


Phil Bell

Editor, Classic Cars magazine

For more details of the latest issue, visit www.classiccarsmagazine.co.uk

 

VW Karmann Ghia

It's time for the VW Karmann Ghia to shine! 

It's time for the VW Karmann Ghia to shine! 

While much of the Le Mans/Nürburgring/Brands Hatch-obsessed classic car market chases up values of hardcore performance models, cars like the VW Karmann Ghia look increasingly good value. Of course they’re not going to impress anyone with vivid acceleration, big horsepower boasts and heroic handling, but there really is more to classic motoring than driving a car like you stole it. This, coming from someone with a history of TVR and Porsche ownership.

What the Karmann Ghia does do very well is look pretty and cruise along with carefree ease. Lovely examples can be found for around £10k, which wouldn’t buy you much of a Triumph TR6 these days.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 16 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.

Phil Bell

Editor, Classic Cars magazine

For more details of the latest issue, visit www.classiccarsmagazine.co.uk

 

Classic Winners and Losers

More than 60 classics have jumped in value since the last update to the Classic Cars magazine Price Guide, and the list published in the latest issue makes fascinating reading.

Despite a widely-reported cooling off in classic values in 2016 there are plenty of exceptions, ranging from obviously hot models like the BMW M535i (up 54% to £10k in top condition) to the quietly-appreciated Swallow Doretti (up 50% to £60k). Tellingly, there are no Ferraris or early Porsche 911s in the top slots, though high-performance versions of the 993 generation cars are increasingly appreciated for their last-of-the-air-cooled status.

The top ten fallers include the until-recently climbing Mercedes 190 SL and Rolls Corniche, though their single-digit declines haven’t transformed them into instant bargains just yet.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 16 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.

 

Phil Bell

Editor, Classic Cars magazine

 

For more details of the latest issue, visit classiccarsmagazine.co.uk.

To see the digital edition for Android devices click here

To see the digital edition on iPad or iPhone click here 

Alfa 2600s come out of the shadows

Prices for Alfa 2600 Spiders and Sprints are being driven up by buyers who favour glamorous styling and fine engineering over backlane sporting dynamics.

You can now pay £90k and £48k respectively for the Touring and Bertone-designed Sixties cruisers respectively. With their handsome twin overhead cam straight sixes offering 145bhp, they offer a taste of the Aston Martin/Maserati highlife for a fraction of the cost. A smart and very stylish way to spend your money indeed.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 16 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.
 

Phil Bell

Editor, Classic Cars magazine

 

For more details of the latest issue, visit classiccarsmagazine.co.uk.

 

To see the digital edition for Android devices click here 

To see the digital edition on iPad or iPhone click here

BMC Bargain!

The BMC 1100/1300 range is your chance to own a sharp slice of Pininfarina styling riding on an even sharper chassis for a fraction of the cost of an early Mini. 

Usable examples of the Austin and Morris versions start at £1000 while even the up-spec MG, Riley and 1300GT alternatives are only three times that in equivalent condition – the mini-limo Vanden Plas and Wolseley variants fall in between. Of course, perfection costs – you’d have to budget more like £8k for a well restored MG, Riley or 1300GT, and proportionately less for the others.

If you’re tempted, have a look at the detailed buying guide in the latest issue of Classic Cars magazine for all of the essential checks and model choice guidance you could wish for, plus specialist expert views and real owner experiences to make the process as easy as possible.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 16 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.

 

Phil Bell

Editor, Classic Cars magazine

 

For more details of the latest issue, visit classiccarsmagazine.co.uk.

To see the digital edition for Android devices click here 

To see the digital edition on iPad or iPhone click here

Fiat X1/9 is a Sleeper

Fiat’s crisp, wedgy X1/9 showstopper is still being overlooked by buyers looking for the next big thing, but what else delivers such futuristic Bertone styling for well under £5k?

Choose a car in one of the more eye-catching Seventies colours and you’ll be sure to stand out from the crowd for all the right reasons during the next events season as you feel like an actor from an out-take of Blake’s 7. Shiny space jumpsuit optional.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 16 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.

 

Phil Bell

Editor, Classic Cars magazine

 

For more details of the latest issue, visit classiccarsmagazine.co.uk.

To see the digital edition for Android devices click here

To see the digital edition on iPad or iPhone click here

Turbo Saab Time!

The original Saab 99 Turbo still looks good value compared to many of its period rivals, with good examples still popping up for less than £10k.

It may lack the wilder image of some of its turbocharged contemporaries, but this was a landmark car in the story of turbocharging and has always enjoyed a cult following. Owning one says, ‘I could have bought a six-cylinder BMW or turbocharged Ford, but I don’t follow fashion.’

Crucial to the appeal are those cool Inca alloys, and original fabric interiors set the package off nicely, so think twice about paying too much for modified examples.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 16 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.

Phil Bell

Editor, Classic Cars magazine

 

For more details of the latest issue, visit classiccarsmagazine.co.uk.

To see the digital edition for Android devices click here 

To see the digital edition on iPad or iPhone click here

 

Car Assembly Axed at MG Longbridge Plant.

MG has announced that it will stop assembling cars at the historic Longbridge plant, despite a year-on-year rise in sales of 18%. 

MG’s parent company, SAIC Motors, currently ships in part-built vehicles for completion at the Longbridge plant. However, cars will no longer pass through the MG factory as fully built cars ready for sale will land straight in from China.

Following a cost-cutting drive, this process will “no longer be required”, despite rising sales of 18% year-on-year and a 130% increase in market share.

The firm has confirmed there will be 25 job losses as a result, but sales, marketing and after-sales operations will remain at the plant.

The announcement comes only five years after the production line was reopened, some 16 years since the last new MG began production in the West Midlands.

More than 400 design engineers and other staff employed at the SAIC Motor Technical Centre (SMTC) site are not affected. Two models are currently designed within this facility, the MG3 supermini and the GS SUV. 

Where possible, production staff would be moved into new role, a spokeman for MG has confirmed. 

The Labour MP for Birmingham Northfield, Richard Burden, has criticised the decision, labelling the announcement as “hugely disappointing and premature.”

The Government are apparently willing to meet MG to discuss options. Quite how sales will be affected now that cars are no longer assembled in the UK remains to be seen. 

MERCEDES TEMPTATION

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Classic car magazines can be guilty of unrealistically low ‘Prices from £Xk’ headlines in the hope of snaring new readers, but at Classic Cars magazine we focus on what you’d really pay for a car in a condition that you’d actually want to own. So when the latest issue says that a Mercedes 230 SLK can be yours from £2.5k, we’re talking about a good example with 60-70k miles and full service history.

Incredible value for such a refined and once expensive roadster, and one with the party trick of a push-button, folding electric hardtop. Even the 320 V6 isn’t much more than twice that for a similarly well-looked after example. All you have to do is navigate your way around the poorly maintained examples that have been glossed up for a quick profit, so it’s worth checking out the buying guide in the latest issue of Classic Cars magazine which details the most serious and expensive faults, and shows you how to spot them. After that all you need to do is seize the best bits of our sporadic summer, yours at the push of a button.

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 16 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.

For more details of the latest issue, visit classiccarsmagazine.co.uk

To see the digital edition for Android devices click here

To see the digital edition on iPad or iPhone click here

Fancy receiving the latest classic news direct to your inbox? Sign up to our FREE newsletter here.

 

MARKET WINNERS OF THE MONTH

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There’s a lot of talk this year about the classic car market cooling off, particularly the high-value auction darlings typified by Mercedes 300 SL Gullwings and Roadsters, chrome-bumper Ferraris and pre-impact bumper Porsche 911s. You can look for deeper meaning to this, but the most rational explanations seem to be over-supply from vendors trying to cash in on a boom, and buyer disillusionment with the belief that values will values will continue to soar at the same rate.

 

 

But this cooler mindset doesn’t apply evenly throughout the classic car market, as evidenced by the Market Movers data in the latest issue of Classic Cars magazine. The top ten climbers have all grown by at least 23 per cent since the last update, with some surprising top performers like the Austin Atlantic and Ford Corsair GT each jumping more than 40 per cent and even numerous classics like MG Midget MkII and MkIII climbing 33 per cent. Porsche 968 Club Sports and BMW CSLs have both shown another recent spurt, at 38 and 33 per cent respectively, so it’s hard to generalise where the recent growth has concentrated, and ever more challenging to predict where it will strike next. 

Buying advice and market analysis is part of 16 pages of buying information in every issue of Classic Cars magazine, including Quentin Willson’s Smart Buys, Russ Smith’s Market Watch, in-depth buying guides and Ads on Test.

For more details of the latest issue, visit classiccarsmagazine.co.uk

To see the digital edition for Android devices click here

To see the digital edition on iPad or iPhone click here

DEATH FOR DOLLARS : THE FORD PINTO

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All you need to know about the Ford Pinto: It was a compact car. It was introduced for 1970. It had an identical twin - the Mercury Bobcat. It was a best seller. Or, at least, that’s what Ford wants you to think. It actually enjoyed burning people alive. Don’t believe us? Read on.

Is the Ford Pinto the most infamous car in history?

Is the Ford Pinto the most infamous car in history?

Lets set the tone. Ford desperately needed an economical, compact car to compete with invading imports from Japan and Europe. Ford executive Lee Lacocca brought the idea of an inexpensive, small, light car costing less than $2000 to the table. To keep the car light, everything was scaled down with an inline-four engine under the bonnet. It appeared to be the perfect answer to an economic climate pushing wages down and fuel prices up. The Ford Pinto finally arrives for September 11, 1970. 

Lets set the scene two years later. A factory fresh Ford Pinto suffers engine problems and stalls in traffic. A fellow motorist travelling at 28mph hits the Pinto from behind and watches in horror as the Pinto is engulfed in a fireball, burning the driver, one Lily Gray, to death and permanently disfiguring her 13-year-old passenger, Richard Grimshaw. In true American fashion, this accident resulted in a lawsuit - with Grimshaw suing Ford for crafting dangerous cars within their factory premises. 

The danger could be found with the fuel tank, positioned between the rear bumper and the rear axle, which in the event of a shunt could separate the filler neck from the tank and spray fuel up the underside of the car. In the nastiest of circumstances this would lead to horrendous infernos where inhabitants jammed in the cabin had hot death to look forward to.  A further issue with the rear end design found protruding bolts from the differential puncturing the fuel tank - leaving you with rather poor fuel consumption into the bargain. 

Ford responded to the Grimshaw lawsuit claiming that the Pinto was as safe and robust as any other car on the road at that time. However, Grimshaw’s law team managed to obtain information gathered from rear-end collision tests on the Pinto, carried out by Ford itself in 1970, well after the first Pinto had left the production line. These results documented that out of 11 collision tests, eight vehicles impersonated a blast furnace - catching fire to a spectacular degree. Just to make things interesting, the three that didn’t go up in flames had safety devices installed. 

It wasn’t until journalist Mark Dowie started researching the subject that he discovered Ford’s Cost-Benefits analysis of the Pinto’s defect - basically, human life wasn’t worth spending money on.  Fitting extra safety features would set the Ford Motor Company back the sum total of $137 million. A large sum of money by any account, but Ford bigwigs opted for a different route. They were more than happy to continue churning out the Pinto unchanged, as litigation from victims were estimated to cost less than $49.5 million. They even went ahead and predicted that 180 people would perish in Pinto fires.

Ford didn’t therefore install any safety features on their Pinto and, by September of 1977, flaming Pintos were killing estimates of seventy people each year. To spice things up further, it was discovered that Ford lobbied to delay a Federal Bill of 1970 enforcing compulsory safety standards around the rear of vehicles. It finally became law in 1978, just as Pintos were recalled for refit. Richard Grimshaw was finally awarded $125 million in damages - although, strangely, this was reduced to $3.5 million.

Did Ford really fix the problem? Installing a deeper filler neck and a protective shield did appear to reduce fatalities - but the Pinto will be forever known as the car equivalent to a serial killer.  The ‘Devils-Hatchback’ is the confirmed cause of at least 27 deaths in America. 

This is a shame, really, as the entire fiasco overshadows the little Pinto’s merits. It was surprisingly spacious, it could achieve  reasonable fuel economy and, considering its basis, wasn’t all too horrific to gaze over. Yet, movie moments such as this help cement the Pinto firmly in place as a health hazard.

Should you buy a Pinto? Well, seeing as they are rarer than hen’s teeth in Britain, why not go for a Ford Fiesta? Besides the tendency to cook you alive, they are remarkably similar.  

A NEW WAVE OF BARGAIN CLASSICS IS HEADING TO THE UK FROM AUSTRALIA. SO WHAT’S GOING ON?

A new wave of bargain classics is heading to the UK from Australia. So what’s going on?

A new wave of bargain classics is heading to the UK from Australia. So what’s going on?

Demand for good right-hand drive vehicles combined with currency fluctuations has seen a flow of classics return to the UK from Australia. 
Sydney-based classic dealer Supercar Secrets said it originally built its business by importing cars from the UK for Australian buyers. But over the past year, it has sent both barn finds and fully-restored cars in the opposite direction.
Mark Haybittle, co-owner, said: ‘All these classics have barely any rust and low mileages because they tend to be used at the weekends as fun cars, and because of the market conditions they’re proving very attractive to UK buyers right now. 
‘It’s very similar to what happened with the Californian cars. We’ve had a few enquiries before, but as the dollar has really dropped in the last year, there’s been a lot more demand from Britain.’
But a more international market, and the ease of overseas bidding, is also making a huge difference. ‘Tiny’, a member of the sales team at the Sydney-based auction house Shannons, added: ‘We have noted increased demand from overseas since the introduction of online bidding. The demand has come from all over the world – a Sunbeam that recently returned to the UK is a good example. 
‘It’s as much about online bidding and the rarity or quality of the particular vehicles that’s driving this demand as weaknesses in the Australian dollar.’ 
Simon Purdue of Cosmopolitan Cars, North Hobart, Tasmania, reckons that although top-end cars feature in the list of cars coming to the UK from Australia, it’s not exclusively so. 
‘A friend of a friend recently sent a 25,000km out-of-the-box E28 M5 to Munich Legends in England. The seller was willing to accept A$50,000 (£27,000) here in Australia, but could not get a buyer to settle on what seemed like a lot of money. Munich Legends sold it for £56,000.’ 
Purdue currently has a Porsche 911 Turbo in stock that has two owners, with 90,000km on the odometer, and is ‘totally original’. He knows of two similar cars that have sold for A$93,000–95,000 (£50,000–51,500). He believes his 930 could be tempting for a UK buyer.
Supercar Secrets’ Haybittle added that 1970s and 1980s supercars, including the Porsche 911 and Ferrari 308GTB, were proving the most popular. He has also exported Jaguar Mk2s, Triumph TR6s and Rover P6s back to their country of origin. 
Kristian Appelt, Director of Adelaide-based Iron Lady Imports, thinks people moving to, and leaving, Australia is also having an effect: ‘In the past we mainly shipped cars from the UK to Australia, often for ex-pat Aussies returning home. 
Now traffic for cars from Australia to the UK has increased to the point where it is a fairly even split. Demand is definitely up and the closer the exchange rate approaches 50p to the Australian dollar, the more demand increases.’
He added: ‘We’ve seen an increase in people travelling to Australia for work, taking cars back with them, especially “cashed up” ex-pats with highly paid roles in the mining industry.’  
The message is clear – if you’re looking to buy, don’t discount Australia. 

David Simister, with additional reporting by Brett Nicholson and Jack Yan