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1967 JAGUAR E TYPE SERIES 1 4.2 LITRE FHC FHC - £78,000

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1967 Jaguar E type Series 1 4.2 Litre FHCChassis number: 1E21637Registration number: KES250FA car prepared to semi Lightweight spec with a wonderfully original leather interior. The bonnet & rear body seams have been removed to give the car a very aerodynamic appearance in addition to having the bumpers removed.The current owner writes the following:As a consequence of its relatively good survival rate the E-Type Jaguar is by no means a rare car. For example, if one is to believe the DVLA figures now available on the interne, there are twenty times more series one 4.2 litre E.-Types still licensed for use on British roads than there are surviving 4.2 litre examples of the series one X26.This is an interesting comparison because both cars were built over a four and a half year period. The E-Type's far better survival rate is surprising when you consider that there were around 33000 right hand drive examples of the series one 4.2 I XJ6 built compared to around 1500 examples of the right hand drive series one 4.2 the E-Type. The figures on this website may be overly pessimistic but presumably they're equally pessimistic for both Jaguars. This large disparity in survival rate may simply be due to the fact that sports cars like the E-type have always been considered to be worth saving whereas elderly saloon cars become no inexpensive that they're denied regular maintenance and are often run into the ground and scrapped. As a consequence, E-Types are to be found at almost any classic are event whereas when was the last time you saw a Fiat 130 Coupe? I use this example because the most modem car in my small collection is probably the only surviving rhd manual example (dating from 1972). When a car is as rare as the Fiat it's particularly important to keep its specification as original as possible. I felt no such imperative with the E-Type which I decided to tailor to my own preferences.I used as a starting point my favourite E Type. a series one fixed head coupe (two seater). I've been driving E-Types for over twenty years having previously owned a series one (two plus two) and a series two the both of which represent good value for money but arc slightly compromised aesthetically. The 2+2 by the greater height of its roof and windscreen and the series two by the huge and rather crude front and rear sidelights and the chronic plated "trailer panel" below the rear bumper of the series 2. Clearly Jaguar entrusted the design of these details to someone with no aesthetic sense.I'd been looking for a suitable series one two seater the for about 3 years after parting with my series two. 1 particularly wanted a 4.2 with the more comfortable seats and the all synchromesh gearbox. The antiquated Moss box is fine for a Mk VII or an SS saloon but doesn't suit the character of the E-Type. As for the seats I'm not sure what shape and size you have to be to find an early E-Type comfortable.Prices were becoming stratospheric and it was proving difficult to find a car which had a good original interior. I have a strong preference for an original interior and especially original leather seats and most E-Types I saw had seats recovered in new leather or were so tatty that they were in need of re-covering. I feel that a car loses something when its interior is completely renewed. In much the same way a leather jacket with a few years (or preferably a few decades) patina is infinitely preferable to a brand new oneI finally discovered a 1967 signal red E-Type series one two seater fhc with a lovely original dark red interior. KES2505 is an original right hand drive home market car. them were bodywork issues lo be addressed but the car was in fine mechanical fettle.I discovered that fitting very wide rear tyres can make changing a wheel virtually impossible although if the tyres aren't too wide it's possible to jack up the car just inside the wishbone (on the opposite side to the wheel you want to change) thus allowing the suspension on the other side to drop as far as it can. To achieve the desired effect of making wheels fit the arches better but without going for hugely wide wheels 1 decided to have a set of wheels specially manufactured in which the outer rim is offset outwards in relation to the hub. Thus the spinner is set inwards in relation to the rim which has a more deeply dished appearance than a standard wheel. Overall, the new wheels project two inches further out in comparison to the standard wheels. The rear wheel arches are slightly flared to accommodate these offset wheels and to allow the wheels to be changed without dropping the rear suspension. These unique wheels were built around 6 1/2 inch rims and I've had them shod with the 205mm wide tyres which most E-Type owners fit these days (even to the 5" wheels). These are only 20mm wider than the 185mm tyres which are standard for the E-Type. A surprising range of tyre widths can he safely fitted to

  • 31000 Miles
  • Transmission 69197354786223e29b85070a0695cc247a4c2b215c743673c2d02e864b4cd687 MANUAL
  • Steering ca68a9643bbb915d30839040f432af59e679db8cf98e23a4378cbef2ed805059 RHD
  • RefCode: AETV13410100